Overview of System Analysis

Going through what ‘System Analysis’ is about, lets have a quick definition of it.

The Study of a business problem domain to recommend improvements and specify the business requirements and priorities for the solution.

System analysis helps to provide the team the better understanding of the problem domains that is needed to be focused on it. Here the research is to be made of what works and find if there is any solution that works even better that existing one. As we know that working with the system users, there requires the clear business requirements and expectations that needs to be developed. One more thing that affects the system analysis is ‘Business drivers’. Completion of analysis, leads in need to update of many deliverables produced earlier, during system initiation. But this reveals many ideas and the revision of the project goals and also the business scope. The idea leads us to know whether the project is small or too big. It also gives us the ideas of the schedule and budget. And after all this the feasibility itself becomes clear. If the project is feasible then the project can be continued else it can be cancelled.

We all know that the project managers, system analysts and system users are the primary stakeholders in the system analysis.

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My recent desktop app

I have been working so long for a demanded desktop application. And today I have finished it. This app is for the commercial use. I named it as “Excel to XML for Tally”. Researching it i have used OpenXML SDK 2.5 to complete this project. Using C#.NET in visual studio, working with the resource file I completed this task of me.

This app lets you to convert the excel file into tally voucher which could be easily uploaded into “Tally”. As far as I know i have been working it on 15 days. This app works on .NET 4.5 environment to install. It was a tough task for me to make the exact sample of the XML file that was handed to me. In order to install this desktop app, you need .NET 4.5 framework installed in your machine.

I am now working it to run on the older version of framework in windows. I am also working now on the licensing part to which i could make it more commercial. Hope I will be able to make it proprietary.

Controlling children from the misuse of internet via apps

When it comes to the technology part, almost all of us are
enjoying it. But have we ever thought of our younger ones how they are using it.
Of course it is one of the most challenging issues for now. Now these things can
be controlled by the help of new apps that could monitor the children of 2 to 13
years old, on their use of internet.

When the stuffs comes relating to the smartphone, it is clear
that we all have the ‘internet on the go’, but it seems to be obvious that the
children of younger age are far. One of the app from the company Kytephone names
namesake helps the parent to have the access of what they want. This apps not
only monitor the children from the internet use but also keep an virtual eye on
their every activity on the phone.

“Smartphones and tablets have added new technology, with new
challenges (for parents) full Web browsing capability, unlimited texting, access
to hundreds of thousands of good, bad and malicious apps,” said Russ Warner,
chief executive officer of the Salt Lake City based company.

Apart from that a web based tool is also available to keep an
eye from the different issues like cyberbullying, social networking issues of
the facebook and twitter. The subscription for this tool is available for $19.99
per annum. For the younger age children, playrific is available which is a
locked browser to give access to the contents suitable for them. More and more
apps is on the way to control this issues.

If we have the younger brother and sisters or children you must
be aware of these thing and take a small step towards these issues.

“Kids feel the limitless sense of what’s on the Internet,” said
Playrific CEO Beth Marcus, “but the parents know that it’s not really
limitless.”

Reuters – ‎Monday‎, ‎April‎ ‎1‎, ‎2013

via Natasha Baker